Mark D Segal

Mark D Segal

Toronto, ON

Mark has been making photographs for the past six decades and started adopting a digital workflow in 1999 first with scanning film, then going fully digital in 2004. He has worked with a considerable range of software, equipment, materials and techni...
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Articles

Four New Canson Infinity Arches Papers

Four New Canson Infinity Arches Papers

Legion Paper contacted me a little while back asking if I would like to test four new papers Canson is bringing to market. It’s always welcome news to see an expanded choice of high quality fine-art papers, so I readily agreed, they...

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basICColor display 6 Pro

basICColor display 6 Pro

Introduction My article on basICColor display 6 appeared on this website on May 3, 2020. Since then, basICColor has been working hard to develop advanced features that make the Pro version of this software arguably the most sophisticated monitor calibration and profiling...

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The New Epson SC-P900 Printer Review

The New Epson SC-P900 Printer Review

Introduction and Set-Up I walked home from visiting with a friend, socially distanced and masked as the times require, and as I reached my front door, I was pleasantly surprised to see a large box from Epson America sitting at the doorstep...

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  • Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 455
    What lighting to use for evaluating prints
    on: July 29, 2021 at 3:01 pm

    A lighting environment most likely “correct by default” would be Solux bulbs available from Tailored Lighting in Rochester New York. Many museums and galleries use this lighting. You can use one bulb in a fixture, or buy a track from them and install a number along the track – which is what I have done in my workspace.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 455
    Re: New Canson Infinity Arches Paper
    Reply #1 on: July 29, 2021 at 2:01 pm

    The main thing about the Blend Mode is to prevent hue distortion when making what is intended to be only a tone adjustment, and that’s fine, but whether you use Normal or Luminosity Blend mode isn’t germane to the main purpose of steepening the curve.

    On your first question, the simulation uses a table in the profile. An M3 profile in and of itself contains a wider gamut and deeper Black point (closer to a luster paper or your display) than say an M1 profile particularly with matte papers. So that’s why you see little difference whether that Simulate box is checked or unchecked. But seen without polarizing, the print will more resemble M1 condition, so that’s why softproofing a matte paper using an M3 profile is unreliable. Now, if you were to use a standard, say, M1 profile, it will give you a better prediction of what your print will look like when seen under normal viewing conditions. With that simulation on display, you can then quite reliably adjust your image to achieve the best you can get out of those printing conditions, and the print will resemble what you see on your display if your colour management set-up is quite correct.

    On your second question, yes a D50 viewing booth is the best way to achieve the most apparently accurate match between the print appearance and the display appearance when your display is also calibrated for D50 and the correct brightness level. Notice I used the words “apparently” and “appearance” here, because once we start looking at prints, we are leaving the world of numbers and graphs, which computer programs calculate with merciless consistency, and we enter the world of human visual perception and its merciless inaccuracy and inconsistency. When I hear people talk about “exact” matches, my antennae immediately perk-up. There is a world of commercial photography in which accuracy is expected and achieved – for example, the reproduction of corporate logos, shades of paint, shades of textiles. Many companies insist that the colours produced under various press conditions match identically to the official images and specifications of their materials. And this is all achieved using top-of-the-line profiles and measuring instruments, not visual representation. But once we get into other kinds of photography – say portraits, landscapes and the like, you can stick-up a print in a viewing booth and have the same photo on your display, and experienced viewers with good eyesight will be able to see whether they correspond reasonably well, but to claim exactitude I think may be in most cases an over-reach.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 455
    Re: New Canson Infinity Arches Paper
    Reply #2 on: July 29, 2021 at 1:14 pm

    Hi Mark, thanks for the substantial feedback on this work – much appreciated.

    I agree with your assessment of the pros and cons of M3 profiling. It’s not an unambiguous win-win – there are the trade-offs you mention and whether they’re worthwhile is something readers will need to decide for themselves, having seen the evidence and considerations I laid out here and the results of their own experimentation. I think at least we have enough “meat on the plate” to table the right questions and we’ve now done that.

    I look upon the BVDM Roman #16 target photo as the best and most scientific resource for visual and objective examination of the deep tone separation issue and base my comments on my work with that target, complemented with my own 35D neutral patch set and accompanying graphical representation.  The extent to which M3 profiles open deep-tone separation is limited and subtle. And yes, you’re right, the obvious recourse for opening deep shade detail with say an M1 profile is to use a Curves adjustment layer to steepen the curve in the relevant segment, which I experimented with not only for the current article, but years ago when the issue arose as well for another paper – a Red River product if I remember correctly. It’s doable but the operational challenge (regardless of the Blend Mode) is that the relevant area of the curve is so short that getting this adjustment just right is somewhat tricky. That’s why I commented on it being less simple than it may appear.

    Of course I was not aware of the difference in OEM profiling Measurement Condition between the Canon P1000 and the Epson SC-P5000 – that is indeed puzzling and good you discovered it. I no longer have the Canon printer so I could only test with the Epson. I do have contacts that I can ping to learn more about the inconsistency of approach. I do know who made their profiles for the Epson printers, but have not discussed any other profiles with them. I shall raise it.

    Best regards, Mark

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 455
    Re: Epson EcoTank Technology
    Reply #3 on: July 26, 2021 at 9:20 am

    Oliver, I got rid of my last small HP all-in-one some years ago after I got totally fed-up with their bloated software, recurrent functional unreliability and premature obsolescence; HP has a huge reputation in the large-scale print machine segment where they excel, but in this small stuff, back then not so much. Then I replaced that with a series of Epson and Canon all-in-ones, which each for their own reasons were poor performers. Finally last year I bought an Epson Eco-Tank ET-2760. This is just for office work – it’s a multi-function. After using it for about a year I have to say I have no complaints – in fact more positively – it’s very good. It is EXTREMELY economic on ink, and I have only had to do a nozzle cleaning once since I got it. There are no issues of needing to use it at regular intervals to keep it running properly. There are plenty of print setting options, it’s real easy to set-up and use, it works reliably and on the higher quality settings it produces very good output.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 455
    Re: New Canson Infinity Arches Paper
    Reply #4 on: July 22, 2021 at 8:04 am

    Hi Elliot, thanks glad you enjoyed the article. The main issues for producing an acceptable match are mismatches in gamut volume and maximum Black level. The importance of these mismatches will vary from printer to printer and paper to paper. I think the cheapest and easiest thing you could do for soft-proofing would be to print a good printer evaluation target image (many are downloadable from the Internet) on whichever of those Canson papers you want to try, using Canson’s profile. Let it dry for a few hours, set-it up in your normal viewing conditions for looking at prints, and then go into your Custom Proof Set-Up menu in Photoshop, scroll to the Epson or Canon OEM profiles you have there (depending on whether you are using an Epson or Canon printer) and as you activate each proofing condition on your properly profiled and calibrated monitor, look to see which one most closely replicates the appearance on your monitor of the print you just made, and use that one for softproofing. Once you have edited your photo under those softproof conditions you can use the Canson profile for printing and it should render what you expect.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.