Mark D Segal

Mark D Segal

Toronto, ON

Mark has been making photographs for the past six decades and started adopting a digital workflow in 1999 first with scanning film, then going fully digital in 2004. He has worked with a considerable range of software, equipment, materials and techni...
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Articles

basICColor display 6 Pro

Introduction My article on basICColor display 6 appeared on this website on May 3, 2020. Since then, basICColor has been working hard to develop advanced features that make the Pro version of this software arguably the most sophisticated monitor calibration and profiling...

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The New Epson SC-P900 Printer Review

Introduction and Set-Up I walked home from visiting with a friend, socially distanced and masked as the times require, and as I reached my front door, I was pleasantly surprised to see a large box from Epson America sitting at the doorstep...

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Stopped – Filter Failed

If you use a Mac computer and a recent version of MacOS (not a Windows problem) and you’ve been frustrated by the inability to print a photo because of the error message in Figure 1, you are not alone. There is a...

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  • Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
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    Posts: 431
    Printing Black and White with the Epson P-900
    on: May 5, 2021 at 10:53 pm

    Carbon Black, a.k.a. Black Enhance Overcoat is a particular setting in the Epson driver for the P700/P900 models that is available for high gloss papers. It can be used on these papers in either non-ABW or ABW driver modes. All discussed in my article. The best way for you to decide which mode to use for B&W printing is to select one or two of your favorite B&W files and print them using several optional settings with and without ABW and seeing which you like best in terms of controls and results.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Participant
    Posts: 431
    Re: Printing Black and White with the Epson P-900
    Reply #1 on: May 5, 2021 at 9:45 pm

    Please read my review article. All that is covered in depth.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Participant
    Posts: 431
    Re: Creating Artistic Photographs 
Film to Digital Paradigm Shift: Part 1
    Reply #2 on: April 28, 2021 at 9:43 am

    As the Chinese proverb says: “The first step towards genius is calling things by their proper name.”

    The short and correct term is “default rendering” or even “default processing”.

    It is interesting some found these default rendered examples visually preferable to your renderings too; the crux of the OPs comments.

    Yes Andrew, that’s indeed the term. At the same time, perhaps worthwhile appending the thought that even a default rendering isn’t cast in stone as a default. Our software gives us options for setting default parameters affecting the appearance of that rendering. No-one designing these algorithms ever considered that there’s anything sacrosanct about a default rendering. It’s just a decent jumping-off point.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Participant
    Posts: 431
    Re: Creating Artistic Photographs 
Film to Digital Paradigm Shift: Part 1
    Reply #3 on: April 28, 2021 at 9:09 am

    Since I started this shit-storm, let me restate my complaint.  We are all serious photographers.  We understand that our photos are all processed.  But to simply state “raw files as processed to give a realistic look” is bull shit!  When I see a sky that I know, when I see rocks that I know, and they don’t look the way I know they actually should look – I don’t give a damn about deltaE – it is just wrong!

    I totally appreciate surrealistic photography.  Just don’t tell us it is “processed to give a realistic look.” Our images are all processed.  Can we please be honest about that?

    John, I hear you, but what’s “realistic” changes every hour of the day, to begin with, every season of the year, every weather condition. When it comes to landscape photography the word “realistic” will mean different things to different people depending on their experience – what they’ve seen before, and if a photographer brings home something that looks realistic to him/her as perceived at the moment of capture and that no-one else has seen before, which happens, this too is realistic – a new contribution to a reality lived if only for a moment. It’s a lousy word to use in this context, because while it has an objective sound, it is in fact pretty subjective and experience-driven. So the only issue really is whether the colour pleases or not, and whether it pleases Alain but doesn’t please you, is again a subjective situation. Beauty in the eye of the beholder.

    Otherwise, there are photographic contexts where “realism” is everything and there is a way-station for assessing it. For example, I do a lot of outdoor mural art photography. The works I  photograph devolve from the imagination of the artists, and there is a whole “gesthalt” around how one does that photography. They know the colours and tones they painted, and if they expect from me “realistic” interpretations of their work, they know what they want and that’s what I deliver, because it’s not for me to redefine their palettes or their taste – they wouldn’t have it. Yet even here, I’ll use a gray card as a sanity check on the white balance, but they don’t paint with that in mind and the conditions in which they paint and then I photograph are highly variable, so it’s at best guidance from which to depart as necessary; hence even in that relatively controlled environment, what I render isn’t a dE-accurate version from scene to print, but a rendition of tone and colour that the artist and I agree renders their work about right to our eyes.

     

    Then there is the whole world of commercial product photography, where brand-colours and their dE-ACCURACY are vital to the clients, and that becomes a whole other conversation that has consumed tons of concentration in the photographic, print and packaging industries.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Participant
    Posts: 431
    Re: Creating Artistic Photographs 
Film to Digital Paradigm Shift: Part 1
    Reply #4 on: April 26, 2021 at 8:27 pm

    I don’t even think it’s worth discussing film versus digital in 2021. And more generally speaking, we can process photos to give them pretty much whatever appearance we want – that is partly what art is all about; in any event, when it comes to landscape photography, “realistic” will never mean “accurate” in any objective sense. And what’s “realistic” to one beholder may not be to another. Any idea how much jelly can we nail to a wall?

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.