Dave Chew

Dave Chew

Chagrin Falls, Ohio

I was born and raised in Northeast Ohio where my outdoor experiences defined my life from an early age. From living in Western Geauga County next to what became one of the Western Reserve Land Conservancy’s oldest and largest holdings, to spending ...
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  • Dave Chew
    Dave Chew
    Silver Member
    Posts: 64
    Mastering The Art Of Photographic Composition – Part One
    on: May 4, 2022 at 1:43 pm

    Lovely pictures and an interesting article.  Thank you.

    Just one small and, I’m sorry, pedantic point. Lenses do not change perspective, only where we take the photograph from changes our perspective. Different focal length lenses allow us to select what part of that perspective we want in our picture or image.

    Channeling my inner Ansel Adams…

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    Different focal length lenses allow us to select what part of that perspective we want in our picture or image.” I struggle trying to explain this; I like the way you worded that; very clear. 

    Dave

    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir
    https://www.davechewphotography.com
    Find legacy Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Digitar lens data here: https://www.davechewphotography.com/skdata/

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Dave Chew.
    Dave Chew
    Dave Chew
    Silver Member
    Posts: 64
    Re: Let me introduce you too…
    Reply #1 on: May 3, 2022 at 10:16 am

    Those are wonderful, Jeff. Thank you for posting this.

    Dave

    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir
    https://www.davechewphotography.com
    Find legacy Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Digitar lens data here: https://www.davechewphotography.com/skdata/

    Dave Chew
    Dave Chew
    Silver Member
    Posts: 64
    Re: Field Techniques for Technical Cameras – Lenses and Accessories
    Reply #2 on: May 1, 2022 at 2:57 pm

    Focusing is indeed a very different experience vs large format film. I have very little experience using large format; just a few trials and tests. The simple act of zooming in and out seems so much more cumbersome that positioning a loupe around the screen. I don’t know if it really is, but it feels that way. That tiny screen definitely doesn’t help. As one of my fellow photographer friends likes to point out, the screen on the IQ4 is like 10 iPhone generations old. Crazy P1 didn’t upgrade it at some point. They must have placed a 100,000 unit order 12 years ago and are still burning through them.

    From my perspective, I don’t think of focusing with the technical camera as being more difficult than on my Sony a7r cameras. I’ve used an XF but never owned one. Aside from my original Monochrom, I haven’t used an optical viewfinder in a while. I may just not know what I’m missing. On the other hand, the only time I open up a file and say, “Crap; I missed focus on that one,” is when I was trying some thing sketchy with tilt or I totally forgot to focus. Unfortunately the latter happens usually once during a shoot!

    Capture Integration is wonderful, but I agree trial and experimentation is the crux problem for those who want to learn more. There are many things unique to each system that we users accept and/or take for granted that someone new to the cameras can’t possibly anticipate. For example, I don’t think twice about taking off the back to rotate it, while others hate the thought.

    I don’t know anyone who is an expert at all the systems except for maybe Steve or Brad. I know Alpa intimately and Cambo pretty well, but struggle with details on Arca-Swiss. Lack of a website doesn’t help either.

    I have thought of getting some people together to do a series of videos specific to technical cameras. Fireside chat sort of things like what Kevin did with On the Rocks, Tim Parkin or the two guys at Leica Miami. I know plenty of Cambo users, but I’d have to find an Rm3di user. It’s just that the interest is probably pretty low vs the amount of work involved. A zoom format might work too. Equipment would have to be available so people could see how things set up and work.

    If I could get Steve and Dave G to be interested… You know they used to support a workshop where people could try out equipment. Maybe something like that but virtual that featured actual users. We users could use our own equipment while CI fills in the gaps with their involvement.

    More ideas than time, I’m afraid. Regardless, I’d be happy to get on a video call with you or anyone else who wants to see some hands on details. I’ve got a few Alpa’s and a Cambo Actus lying around.

    Dave

    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir
    https://www.davechewphotography.com
    Find legacy Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Digitar lens data here: https://www.davechewphotography.com/skdata/

    Dave Chew
    Dave Chew
    Silver Member
    Posts: 64
    Re: Field Techniques for Technical Cameras – Lenses and Accessories
    Reply #3 on: May 1, 2022 at 12:44 am

    Hi Michael,

    First, I apologize for missing your post for so long. I thought I subscribed to all the relevant threads but I missed doing that for this one. I was not planning on more detail associates with camera choice, but perhaps I should. I think there are a few areas that could use more discussion:

    1. As you point out, how tilt is applied in each system and the associated advantages of each approach.
    2. The type and amount of movements that can be done with each system. I touched on this a little, but this is so important it could use additional focus.
    3. Packaging: Weight, space, design, extra parts, accessories, etc.

    Since you brought up tilt, I will add a bit here and start with the three primary helical systems. None of the helical-based systems do true axis tilt. I will orient “x” along the length of the lens and “y” vertically. All three systems (Arca/Alpa/Cambo) tilt at the “y” centerline vertically. Because the adjustment knob is at the top, a lot of people think Alpa tilts from a hinge at the bottom of their tilt adapters but they actually don’t; they tilt on the center line “y” axis just like Arca and Cambo. There is a hinge point in the center of Alpa’s T/S adapters about which the adapter tilts and/or swings. All Cambo’s lens mounts tilt in a similar way. Arca’s tilt that is built into the body is also hinged around the lens axis. So from the standpoint of this “y” axis, all the systems are “axis tilt” not “base tilt.”

    I believe all the bellows-type systems discussed (Arca-Swiss, Cambo Actus, Linhof Techno) can be Axis tilt in that the tilt is designed around the lens board centerline. The tilt mechanism is down below near the base rail, but they are designed to rotate about a radius origin in the middle of the lens board. I think Arca’s default is base tilt, but you can get the optional Orbix for axis tilt.

    None of the helical-based systems tilt along the “x” axis lens centerline; they are all behind the lens to some degree.  Each of the “big three” tilt around different points on their helical systems. Cambo is closest to what would be the “x” axis “lens board” centerline since the tilt mechanism is relatively close to the lens elements. Alpa depends on the lens; shorter lenses are about the same as Cambo, while the longer lenses can be pretty far from the lens elements. Arca-Swiss, being in the camera body, is the furthest away. If axis tilt is important factor, then I would suggest a bellows system since none of the helical based systems have true axis tilt. This has never bothered me too much. Again, the closest helical system to axis tilt would be Cambo. There are two good pages that delve into the details of axis vs base tilt here:

    https://www.largeformatphotography.info/how-to-focus.html

    https://lensnotes.com/articles/principles-of-view-camera-focus/

    For me, the biggest differences in tilt between the helical systems are:

    1. Alpa cannot tilt Schneider lenses wider than 60mm because there is no room for the TS adapter. If you need to tilt with wide Schneider lenses, then Alpa is out.
    2. With Cambo, you have to purchase the tilt shift mount with every lens; this adds cost and weight. With Alpa, you need to purchase the 17mm TS adapter and make sure all your lenses are purchased with the short-barrel (SB) mount version. With Arca-Swiss, you get it for “free” in the camera; no additional accessories needed.
    3. With Alpa, you do have the option to tilt or swing the back as well as the lens by simply moving the TS adapter to the back of the camera.

    You asked about my specific choice: I don’t shoot wide that often so this Schneider limitation was outweighed by some of the other features Alpa has that were more important to me.

    Dave

    Edit: Cleaned this up a lot from the original post; it was late last night!

     

    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir
    https://www.davechewphotography.com
    Find legacy Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Digitar lens data here: https://www.davechewphotography.com/skdata/

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    Dave Chew
    Dave Chew
    Silver Member
    Posts: 64
    Re: Field Techniques for Technical Cameras
    Reply #4 on: April 29, 2022 at 4:24 pm

    Hi Ralph,

    Thank you for the comments. I’m glad you got some value from the article. I’ve spent the majority of my life in and around Geauga County.
    Indeed, mistakes are valuable opportunities. One of my favorite quotes: Experience is the ability to recognize a mistake the second time you make it.
    Dave

    How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! - John Muir
    https://www.davechewphotography.com
    Find legacy Schneider-Kreuznach Apo-Digitar lens data here: https://www.davechewphotography.com/skdata/