What lighting to use for evaluating prints

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    Topic: What lighting to use for evaluating prints Read 88 Times
  • Anders Vinberg
    Anders Vinberg
    Silver Member
    Posts: 1
    Printing Colour Management
    on: July 29, 2021 at 2:48 pm

    I calibrate my monitor to AdobeRGB and 6500, and use icc profiles for my Epson P900. I am currently experimenting to educate myself on different papers.

    But what color lighting do you guys recommend for evaluating prints? I know I could use a calibrated viewing booth, but that smacks of pixel peeping, I would prefer a lighting environment that makes it “correct by default” when I take the print out of the printer and put it on a table.

    Currently I do mostly black and white which makes the issue easier, but not entirely moot I think, there is still the issue of grayscale linearity. And I have done color before and will likely do it again.

    Appreciate any practical advice.

    Anders Vinberg

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Silver Member
    Posts: 485
    Re: What lighting to use for evaluating prints
    Reply #1 on: July 29, 2021 at 3:01 pm

    A lighting environment most likely “correct by default” would be Solux bulbs available from Tailored Lighting in Rochester New York. Many museums and galleries use this lighting. You can use one bulb in a fixture, or buy a track from them and install a number along the track – which is what I have done in my workspace.

    Mark D Segal Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop". Please check the PhotoPXL Store for availability.

    Andrew Rodney
    Andrew Rodney
    Participant
    Posts: 171
    Re: What lighting to use for evaluating prints
    Reply #2 on: July 29, 2021 at 3:07 pm

    http://digitaldog.net/files/15TheRightLightpart1.pdf

    http://digitaldog.net/files/16TheRightLightpart2.pdf

    I use both Solux (can’t be beat due to its spectrum) and a GTI booth (not as ideal but used in the print industry).

    The actual CCT numbers are rather meaningless; CCT 6500K is a range of possible colors.

    Lastly, what’s key is calibrating the display to match the soft proof from it, to the light box next to it; YMMV and fortunately, your eye adapts to the new(er) illuminant so if you move that print away, while it is now impossible to see if it matches the display, it should look just fine.

    Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" (pluralsight.com)

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