Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing?

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    Topic: Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing? Read 320 Times
  • Stephen Girimont
    Stephen Girimont
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    Posts: 2
    Papers & Media
    on: April 7, 2020 at 1:07 pm

    I am much more inclined to print on matte papers, but recently produced a few images that simply call out for printing on something a bit more glossy. So I bought a roll of Epson Legacy Baryta. Previous experience with glossy papers had me covering the prints with plain paper for a few days to absorb outgassing prior to framing, so I did that with these prints.

    However, I’m not really seeing much in the way of wrinkling of the cover paper like I would with, say, Luster paper. Does Baryta simply not outgas that much? It has been many years since I last printed anything other than matte paper myself, so maybe they’ve improved, or is there something about baryta papers that limits outgassing?

    -Stephen Girimont
    https://store.theintimatelandscape.com

    Mark D Segal
    Mark D Segal
    Participant
    Posts: 231
    Re: Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing?
    Reply #1 on: April 7, 2020 at 1:32 pm

    You are lucky to have found that paper because it’s gorgeous and along with other similar papers has been discontinued due to supply problems with a chemical input. About your question: The source of the outgassing is the ink. As for the paper, I think not so much the barium sulfate, but the construction of the paper could perhaps make a difference – and as this is all secret sauce not many people (me included) outside the industry could definitively explain the difference between various paper types, except to say the gloss/luster papers have a barrier between the coating and the base to limit ink absorption into the substrate.

    Mark D Segal
    Author: Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8, SilverFast HDR, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop, published by LaserSoft Imaging AG
    https://www.silverfast.com/downloads/92ed080ac1ae274ea6aeed756a504f7a/en.html

    Stephen Girimont
    Stephen Girimont
    Participant
    Posts: 2
    Re: Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing?
    Reply #2 on: April 7, 2020 at 4:11 pm

    You are lucky to have found that paper because it’s gorgeous and along with other similar papers has been discontinued due to supply problems with a chemical input. About your question: The source of the outgassing is the ink. As for the paper, I think not so much the barium sulfate, but the construction of the paper could perhaps make a difference – and as this is all secret sauce not many people (me included) outside the industry could definitively explain the difference between various paper types, except to say the gloss/luster papers have a barrier between the coating and the base to limit ink absorption into the substrate.

    I always figured the outgassing was a relationship between the pigment ink and the coating and figured maybe this baryta coating was somehow absorbing the glycols more than other glossy papers? Who knows?

    And I was very surprised to find it in stock at B&H after reading about the supply issues.

     

    -Stephen Girimont
    https://store.theintimatelandscape.com

    Jan R. Smit
    Jan R. Smit
    Participant
    Posts: 8
    Re: Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing?
    Reply #3 on: April 16, 2020 at 4:46 pm

    My experience with this paper that Epson branded as legacy baryta is that it requires to dry at least 24 jours before mounting on aluminium etc. Else some gas bubbles will form after a day or so, litteraly lifting the paper from the glue film used for the mounting.
    Especially with dark prints or dark areas in the print.

    There is a new version of this paper appearing on the market now.

    The old version also had problems with chipping when bron cut, specifically in black parts of the print.

    The new version seems to be not so “chippy” 😉

     

    Daniel Smith
    Daniel Smith
    Participant
    Posts: 64
    Re: Epson Legacy Baryta Outgassing?
    Reply #4 on: April 18, 2020 at 9:32 am

    After a good time to dry and then mounted and matted you might check the materials used. Matting and framing make for a whole new set of problems.

    https://www.lodima.org/advances-in-archival-mounting-and-storage

    Check out the information on Artcare board for matting and framing. This helps protect your artwork. Staying away from wood frames helps as well when one considers the outgassing from the rabbet alone. Aluminized Mylar tape can seal it and will help.

    Conservation framing techniques give the best option for your work lasting as long as possible. Costs a bit more but is worth it.

     

    "It's not what it is, it's how it looks". Paula Chamlee

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