Harvey Stearn

Harvey Stearn

Sedona, AZ

Harvey Stearn has photographed landscapes and wildlife for over sixty years. Though he was a top executive for two large scale land development and home building corporations, he always found time for his fine art photography which won many awards. H...
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    Topic: My First Major Photography Trip Since 2019 Part II – Yellowstone NP, Wyoming Read 0 Times
  • Harvey Stearn
    Harvey Stearn
    Silver Member
    Posts: 8
    Landscape Image Editing – Recreating What You Saw and What You Felt
    on: November 12, 2021 at 2:29 pm

    Thank you Andrew.

    Harvey Stearn
    Harvey Stearn
    Silver Member
    Posts: 8
    Re: Sony Alpha 1 A1 Article By Harvey Stearn
    Reply #1 on: November 11, 2021 at 9:43 pm

    Louis and Simon, thank you for your comments. You both raise some interesting comments. So, let me share with you some additional observations that I have. First I have not encountered any issues using the manual focus Zeiss Loxia lenses on the Sony Alpha 1, but admittedly don’t exhaust all the different capture situations that can test the camera’s capability. For the type of photography that I mostly do, I find autofocus actually slows me down because there are too many times when the autofocus will snap in on the wrong part of the image. This doesn’t happen when using focus tracking on fast moving subjects, particularly with long lenses. But, it will happen when using shorter focal lengths (100mm or less) for landscapes or other relatively static scenes. However, the biggest reason why I use these lenses is their ability to provide fine detail and control contrast on a fine level. In my editing, I always use too to favor this type of contrast, and really use the overall contrast slider except possibly to reduce overall contrast.

    Simon, I agree that left to its own devices, the Sony cameras including the Alpha 1 don’t always nail the right color balance. That may be the result of natural variation between individual cameras in any given production run; and Japan historically set wider tolerance ranges for production runs, though I don’t know if that is still the case. However, that really isn’t an issue for me, since I usually use a color meter to set the color temperature of my exposures in order to have an easier time with color balance corrections during post edit, and am also primed to compensate for any consistent biases. Also, blaming color balance deviations solely on the camera may not be fair. Lenses can also contribute to any deviations. That’s another reason I prefer the Zeiss Loxia lenses, as I find their color rendition slightly more accurate and consistent than many other lens lines. I’ve been doing photography for seventy years, and have owned hundreds of lenses. Somehow, I keep coming back to Zeiss lenses, though they’ve had some disappointments as well. However, the Loxia series was specifically developed to fully exploit the capability of Sony sensors in their mirrorless cameras. However, I may well be splitting hairs here. In photography, everything comes down to personal tastes, and perhaps also biases. Well, whatever makes us photographers happy!

    Harvey Stearn
    Harvey Stearn
    Silver Member
    Posts: 8
    Re: Landscape Image Editing – Recreating What You Saw and What You Felt
    Reply #2 on: November 11, 2021 at 9:06 pm

    Mark, I apologize for taking so long to reply to your comments of August 28th. I am just now catching up after being gone in September and editing a lot of images in October. I appreciate your taking time to share your thoughts.

    I tend to look at the classical definition of art as implying some degree of skill to capture what the artist (or beginning artist) sees or otherwise experiences for the purpose of communicating said experiences to others, or at least as a reminder of a beautiful or important event. I don’t deny that there is always human subjectivity involved. In fact, it’s impossible for us to be completely objective or anything close to that, even among scientists trained in scientific objectivity. So, I don’t suggest that there are hard and fast rules regarding how to approach one’s art form. Having taught photography during the first fifteen years of my retirement, I always keep in mind people with little direct exposure to relatively untouched Nature, and suggest that photographers get to know their subjects well and present them with reasonable fidelity, or disclose their intents if they substantially alter their images. Either way that does require creativity, skill and integrity. I don’t think that these are merely fine academic distinctions. Neither do I think that an unskilled photographer pointing his or her camera at a subject and pressing the shutter button is automatically creating art, though there certainly can be value in a different way of seeing and composing.

    Probably more to the point is that I feel that Nature is too magnificent to overlook the opportunities to experience it and share it with others. Those of us who do this regularly are really blessed with the joy that we receive.

     

     

    Harvey Stearn
    Harvey Stearn
    Silver Member
    Posts: 8
    Re: Sony R7IV File Size, Processing Power, Storage
    Reply #3 on: September 22, 2019 at 11:27 pm

    Kevin, For some reason, I keep thinking about your first shooting experience with your A7rM4. At the risk of being a pest, I think that there may be an even more accurate explanation for the unexpected initial drabness of your farm scene images, even allowing for the extremely flat lighting. I wonder if your “Creative” setting was either on standard or neutral. I think that one of those is the default setting for Sony cameras. My setting was on Landscape, as that gives me a little more punch to start with, and I can more easily tone that down if necessary than I can find the right balance starting from what is usually a very drab image. As you know, a number of camera manufacturers offer a balance that they call “neutral” which has little or no adjustment to the RAW image so that some photographers can initiate editing with minimal pre-determination. The “Standard” setting is a little more punchy, but a lot closer to Neutral than to the Landscape setting. I’ve used them all over the years. But, I find the latter choice a more effective starting point. The landscape setting builds in more vibrancy and contrast, though I find that I often add a little more vibrancy in my editing anyway, depending on subject and lighting. I remember now that when I used the neutral setting, I was often shocked by the way the starting image looked. So, I’m curious, what creative setting did you have on your rM4 during that first shoot? By the way, I tend to use the Landscape setting even on some of my wildlife shots because the outdoor environment is often the same.

    OK, I promise to give other subscribers a chance at this one!
    H.

    Harvey Stearn
    Harvey Stearn
    Silver Member
    Posts: 8
    Re: Sony R7IV File Size, Processing Power, Storage
    Reply #4 on: September 22, 2019 at 8:47 pm

    Correction to my comments:By auto-color balance I was of course referring to “auto white-balance”. Also, I haven’t yet figured out how to insert a full-sized image into the PhotoPXL texts as Kevin does. But, the reader can click on the partial thumbnail to see a pop-up of the full image.
    HS