David Sutton

David Sutton

Oamaru, We don't have states

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  • David Sutton
    David Sutton
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    Posts: 5
    Should I Buy Luminar AI
    on: February 18, 2021 at 5:33 am

    “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should…”
    Agreed. I see it as neither creative nor art.

    It’s a shame that Luminar is being pushed for its AI features. Because its demosaicing, especially of Fuji files, is really quite good. Equal to C1 for the files I tried it on.

    Last time I looked the two things it lacked were dual monitor support and a robust catalogue/metadata support. I would ditch C1 the moment Luminar got a good catalogue system up and running. And live in hope for the dual monitor thing.

     

     

    David Sutton
    David Sutton
    Participant
    Posts: 5
    Re: The Optimum Digital Expsoure
    Reply #1 on: November 22, 2020 at 12:40 am

    As far as I know, which is not a lot, Magic Lantern for Canon has a raw histogram, and therefore its auto ETTR feature should be accurate. I installed Magic Lantern on my 5D2 and the camera never blew up. And it uninstalled fine when I sold the camera.

    The other issue with histograms being based on the camera jpeg, is the choice of sRGB or Adobe rgb for the colour space makes a difference. For Canon, one was more accurate for highlight clipping and the other for shadow clipping, but I can’t remember which was which.

    Mostly, the dynamic range of modern sensors is so good I don’t worry about under exposing a tad. On my cameras, for those shots that are critical and where I don’t want to bracket, choosing the appropriate film simulation and bringing up the live histogram (particularly for the blue channel) and then decreasing the exposure by 1/3 of a stop will nail everything except small specular highlights. In the past with a Canon sensor I’d increase the exposure by 1/3 of a stop after bring up the histogram. Times change.

    David Sutton
    David Sutton
    Participant
    Posts: 5
    Re: The Optimum Digital Expsoure
    Reply #2 on: November 21, 2020 at 9:27 pm

    Hi John.
    Thanks for your comments.
    I made a short and dirty search and picked that article at random.
    I was looking for someone who could explain the terms and do the math. I felt that the “top 3% contains 50% of your captured data” was false because I see no loss of information or lack of smooth tonal gradations in the midtones or shadows in my images, which would be expected if there was a lack of “data” there. Furthermore, if I photograph a dark to light gradient and apply some edits, the shadows don’t posterise first, the whole lot goes at once.
    Thanks for your link. I have read it before, but I’ll raid the chocolate supply and go back over it in detail.

    To add to the discussion on exposure, ten years ago I’d use UniWB and also ETTR exposure within an inch of its life because the signal to noise ratio on Canon sensors was “Consistently Ruinous And Problematic”, and I was photographing in difficult light. Now with my current mirrorless cameras I just turn the exposure compensation dial until I see detail in the highlights, and press the shutter button letting the shadows fall where they may. What I see is what I get. I guess this is closer to how I’d work with slide film. The shadow detail is fine after processing and 24 inch wide prints (the limit of my printer) look good.
    David

    David Sutton
    David Sutton
    Participant
    Posts: 5
    Re: The Optimum Digital Expsoure
    Reply #3 on: November 19, 2020 at 9:51 pm

    Always good to keep thinking about optimum exposure. I remember reading an earlier version of this article on the Luminous Landscape in 2014, and there was a discussion pointing out that “the top 3% contains 50% of your captured data!” was a myth. This idea is still doing the rounds. A search has brought up this: https://photomorrobay.wordpress.com/ but there are a lot of other references around if you look. David

    David Sutton
    David Sutton
    Participant
    Posts: 5
    Re: Fujifilm GFX 100
    Reply #4 on: July 13, 2019 at 5:09 am

    I had an opportunity to play with a GFX100 at a Fuji event this week.
    It’s been compared to the Canon D series in size. I’ve shot with a 1D and found it a beast to handle. I’m used to a Fuji X-H1 with no battery grip, and what was interesting with the GFX100 was that as soon as I started using it the camera became invisible. No searching for buttons, or grip or other handling issues.
    I don’t have the fasted sd card, and the buffer started to slow after about 18 shots on high speed, saving as raw plus jpeg. Considering the file sizes that’s pretty good.
    Here is a file and crop from the event.
    1/3 second at f7.1, iso 100 and the 32-64mm lens, hand held.
    I’d be happy with that.
    David

     

     

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by David Sutton.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by David Sutton.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by David Sutton.